Every year, I try to take some time away from work and “creating” to refresh my brain and develop new ideas or things that I want to try. At the start of 2020, I started a new podcast, and it is one of my favorite things that I have the opportunity to do! I have received such wonderful feedback over the years and how much others appreciate the shared messages and guests. Still, I look at it as an incredible opportunity to push my own learning.

At the beginning of 2021, I came up with a podcast idea called “Three…


Investment (Definition) — an act of devoting time, effort, or energy to a particular undertaking with the expectation of a worthwhile result.

I started traveling again for work, and I have had a bit of apprehension about the process. I love the work I do, and I don’t mind traveling, but I was nervous about losing the “routine” that I have developed that has led to some really healthy habits. I work out at a similar time each day, eat at the same times, and eat very similar meals in my daily routine. …


The third part of my new book, “Because of a Teacher,” is focused on providing advice that you would give to yourself as a first-year teacher. When I described my hopes for this chapter, it was to share a vulnerability in their own practice as truly accomplished educators and help others see the importance of growth in teaching and learning no matter how long they have been in the profession. No matter how good anyone is at their job, we (including myself) can always grow.

The authors did an incredible job, and this is just one of my favorite quotes…


This is one of my favorite quotes on education from my friend, AJ Juliani:

We talked about this recently on my podcast, and I discuss thinking about shifting from moving to engagement to empowerment.

When I first started teaching, my focus was to make sure students were really interested in the way that I presented information, but then realized, what happens if they don’t have someone doing that for them? Was their interest level in the content dependent solely on my ability to present it to them, or was I helping them learn to create opportunities or learning for themselves?


Now and then, a post that I wrote years ago is tweeted my way, and it is a chance to look back at what I used to share and evaluate my thinking today. The one that was recently shared with me was “5 Ways to Influence Change,” that I originally wrote in 2014. I gave it a “Grammarly” update as I cringed at some of the errors in the post, but many of the ideas shared resonate today. In fact, some of them I am more adamant about.

Here are the five ways I suggested without the explanations from the…


It was great to chat with Dr. Catlin Tucker on her podcast titled “The Balance.” I have always enjoyed her blog, and we have recently published her latest book with Katie Novak, “UDL and Blended Learning: Thriving in Flexible Learning Landscapes.

We covered many topics during her podcast, but as I was listening, I wanted to highlight one in particular.

I shared the idea of focusing on creating the incredible thing we want to do in our schools and classrooms and not waiting for someone to give permission to do so.

The example I shared was with portfolios. If you…


As of my last recorded weigh-in, I have officially crossed the 100 pounds lost plateau since August 2020. I am pretty proud that I have got to this point, but I am also excited for continued growth. I haven’t decided what is next as this was a goal that I had set out for myself, and I know that once I reached losing 100 pounds, I would re-evaluate what I would want to do next for my health and fitness goals.


Many educators are now about to apply for new positions in the field or are already deep into the hiring process. I receive many questions about applying for jobs, as well as conducting the process. I decided that it would make sense to put this post together with some of the links that I have shared with others in the past (at the bottom of this post) and some quick points for those in either the position of holding interviews or being the “interviewee.” Of course, every school and district has its own procedures for conducting this process, but I…


In my last post titled, “A Fear of Success and the Elevation of Others,” I wrote the following:

Education is about elevation.

Not only of our students but of one another. Everything we do to create better opportunities for those we serve should be cheered on and learned from, but they don’t have to be replicated in every classroom as it is. We all bring different strengths, passions, and talents to our classrooms, and utilizing them to provide great but varied experiences, is beneficial to learning.

One thing that is important to me is that we, as adults, are modeling…


A teacher recently reached out to me and shared her frustration of being “held back” by her own school administration for pursuing a new idea that she believed would be beneficial to students. I shared the following story from “The Innovator’s Mindset”:

Years ago, another educator shared a similar story, explaining that she wanted to try something new called “blogging.” The teacher asked her principal if she could try it out and, at the time, was told “no.” The reason? The principal was concerned that if the venture succeeded, everyone on staff would be expected to do it.

What?

At…

George Couros

Innovative Teaching, Learning, and Leadership Consultant. I also like dogs.

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